Fixing WifiModem64 Version 1.0

As hinted at earlier, I made a couple of mistakes when designing version 1.0 of the WifiModem64 and they will be fixed in version 1.1.

Still, with some minor manual modifications, those first boards are still usable. In short, RTS must be connected to WeMos D7 instead of D8 for the ESP8266 to boot reliably and the WS2812 LED must be connected to WeMos D5 instead of D0 if you intend to use it.

These are the step-by-step instructions to get WifiModem64 V1.0 on line: Continue reading

SyncFix64 Prototype

After the encouraging results of my first attempt to fix the composite signal from a C64, so that the cheap TFT monitor could display it, I shared the idea on Forum64 to double-check and get some feedback. Consensus seems to be that the circuit at least won’t hurt the video source. Since, in addition to that, it seems to be working for me, I decided to design a board for it in KiCAD.

The goal was to make it so small that it would fit inside the display’s case alongside the display controller, so I went for all surface mount components. To get immediate results, I created a single sided layout and etched the board myself using the toner transfer method. Continue reading

Cheap Displays for Old Hardware

A couple of months ago I dug out my old Commodore hardware again and started tinkering with it – the goal being to finally try out a bunch of mods, hacks, and builds that I missed back in the day. To start with, I bought a cheap TFT display (new link on eBay, even newer link on eBay) for around 13€ to connect to the C64 and C128.

It was meant to sit on my work bench to e.g. quickly test a naked C64 board. It wouldn’t matter if the video quality wasn’t great. But after I made the necessary adapter cable and hooked everything up, I was a little disappointed to find out that the display wouldn’t show anything other than a black screen interrupted by an occasional flicker. I verified that the display itself was working by connecting it to a Raspberry Pi and I double-checked the cable I had made. Continue reading

The Modular WifiModem64

I’ve been playing with the ESP8266 since late 2014 and it was love on first sight: so many possible uses for such a small device at such a low price tag. And very early on I thought: wouldn’t it be great to build a WiFi “modem” from this? That shouldn’t be too hard. But I didn’t find the time to pursue the idea then. When I remembered again this summer, I was not surprised but still excited to find that others had had the same idea and hadn’t been as lazy as me.

Alwyz’s instructions on how to build such a device couldn’t be easier! I followed them and it worked like a charm. For the next months, my setup then looked like variations of this:

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SD2IEC Revisited

When I discovered the MMC2IEC / SD2IEC project by chance back in 2009, it made me dig up again my soldering iron and electronic components after many years of disuse. I built myself one of those devices on a prototyping board and had a lot of fun doing so. It was the first time that I got involved with micro controllers and I learned a lot in the process.

Now, many years and projects later, I was looking for an excuse to try out KiCAD and to learn how to design my own boards using it. I had already ordered a small PCB I found on the net as a proof-of-concept to see if the Gerber files I produce would result in working boards. When they turned out just as expected I was eager to create something myself. This was the perfect opportunity to revisit the subject and make myself a brand new SD2IEC.

I wanted the design to be based on Shadowolf’s latest version but also make my own additions and changes:

  • The board should be able to tap into the cassette port of the C64 for power supply.
  • It should be board for external use with proper connectors just like my first build.
  • All components should be cheap to buy from Chinese suppliers.

So, this is the first prototype of what I came up with. I call it the “SD2IEC pluggable”:

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Making a XU1541 Cable

I have been documenting interesting software and programming related findings in my own private Wiki for a few years now. This turned out to be really useful in many cases, especially on topics that I would run into only very infrequently. Most of these notes would not be of any interest to anybody else but me, while a few of them might be worth offering to a wider audience. All it would take would be some nice presentation and a little effort to write things down in whole sentences. Or so I thought.

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The finished XU1541 adapter.

When I began tinkering with electronics again, I soon decided this would be a great excuse to start my own blog, sharing my progress. After my initial enthusiasm had worn off, I soon realized that I had somewhat underestimated this project. It takes a good deal of time and effort to write things down in whole sentences and to present them nicely. As a result, there are a few projects that I finished this year that I failed to put up here so far. Most likely, I have forgotten a lot of interesting details by now. But I’ll try and summarize what I do remember.

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Making a XA1541 Cable

As you might have read in my previous post, I retrieved  my old Commodore hardware from the attic and found it still working. Even most of the 5 1/4″ floppy disks that I inserted into one of the squeaking 1541 drives seemed still readable. So, I decided this might be the last chance to save those very early lines of code from oblivion that I had written so many years ago. Not that it was really worth it, it’s mostly a matter of principle to not let a single bit of code get lost if I can help it. To convert what was still readable to d64 disk images, I first needed to make a suitable adapter cable.

The XA1541 seemed like a good choice to start. It’s an adapter to connect the Commodore 1541 disk drive to the parallel port of a PC. While there are other solutions, the XA1541 seemed easy enough to build and reported to work with most (all?) parallel ports found in today’s PCs. If there is a parallel port to be found at all. We’ll cover that in a later post on making a XU1541 cable, though.

Also, there are excellent instructions by Stefan Uhlmann on how to make one of these. The page is available in German only but very well illustrated.

All that is needed are two connectors (obviously), a length of shielded wire, four resistors, and four transistors to drive the interface. Just as Stefan suggested, I wanted to fit the active components onto a small piece of prototyping board inside the D-sub casing of the parallel port connector. The first step is to cut the board so that it will fit into the casing while still leaving as much room for the components as possible.

xa-1541-step1

Fitting the board into the connector's casing.

The board fits smoothly between the two rows of the D-sub connector, and the connector is then soldered directly onto the board. The lead-wire spacing of the connector does not match that of the prototyping board, but that doesn’t matter. Only the four left most leads 14-17 of the connector, marked with a green box in the picture, must not be shorted. The other leads 18-25 on this side get all connected to GND anyway.

Solder the d-sub connector to the board.

Do not shorten pins 14 - 17.

Next, I placed the four resistors and transistors on the board and fixed their wires with soldering points.

It really helped and saved time to have Stefan’s images as a guideline. Since I placed the components exactly where Stefan did, all I needed to do then was to spread solder onto the copper side of the board until the shiny pattern looked like the one on Stefan’s picture.

Finally, the the leads from the shielded wire are attached and everything gets stuffed into the D-sub connector’s casing. The DIN connector fitting into the Commodore IEC serial bus is soldered to the other end of the cable and we’re all done.

The XA1541 is ready to connect our trusty 1541 drive to our PC. Using a great piece of code called OpenCBM (formerly known as cbm4linux) we are now able to access the data from the 5 1/4 inch disks.